Statement

 Metropolitan Avenue in Brooklyn

Metropolitan Avenue in Brooklyn

During my years of work in the architectural field, I learned how to portray three-dimensional structures and spaces with two-dimensional representations, specifically architectural drawings. This experience has had a profound effect on the way I go about photographing a scene, especially if it contains man-made structures, whether buildings or New York City subway stations. My photographic sensibility is inclined to the ways in which lines, shapes, and even tones relate to the edges of the frame, and allow me to "build" an image within it. Photography lets me take such images beyond their factual architectural character to make them less strictly representational, and more evocative of emotions or states of mind.

Labyrinthine spaces are attractive to me because they are complex, intricately engineered, and architecturally designed. These environments have the possibility of becoming more than just physical spaces, but also mind spaces. The way people interact with imposed spaces influences their thinking and behavior. For this reason, by presenting a photographic space considered to be alien by some, I can begin to generate questions in the viewer’s mind. In turn, the viewer’s questions and reactions may encourage them to build their own concepts about what they are seeing, based on the experience I am communicating through the photographs. 

The decisions I make when photographing architecture involve interpreting the space based on my interaction with the environment. My aesthetics are dictated by the cerebral response that the images may stimulate in the audience, whether of beauty, disturbance, isolation or even surrealism. My goal is to allow viewers to arrive at their own psychological interpretation based on what they see in the images.